Wednesday, April 5, 2017

Tornadoes and Thought Cyclones

So, a week/lifetime ago we woke up at 2:11 a.m. because it sounded like a freight train was driving through our master bedroom and, once my ears adjusted to the overwhelming sounds of what turned out to be 80+ mph winds overhead, it became clear there were tornado sirens going off as well. I grabbed my phone and read all caps TORNADO WARNING IN YOUR AREA. SEEK SHELTER NOW. Claire flew into our room as I was reading those alarming words because lightning lit up the sky and thunder hit our house so hard it felt like the whole thing shook. Our power went out right then and I wished, for the rare time, that our house was not 50% made of glass.


We don't have any interior rooms, or walk-in closets, or a basement (obviously; this is Texas), so our best "storm shelter" is the girls' bathroom, which has a small window, but also has a thousand pound cast-iron tub and a half wall with plumbing in front of it, which from my extensive google research, means it's our best bet. The kids get in the tub. James and I sit on the floor and wait for the roof to start shaking, at which point, we'd probably lay ourselves on top of the kids. It's a fun thing to think about at 2-fucking-30 a.m.

The tornado warning expired at 2:35 and the tornadoes missed us, though the winds still did plenty of damage and we didn't get power back for another 10 hours. Landon and Cora went right to sleep, but Claire came into our room every 20 minutes for the next 2 hours to ask "is the tornado coming back? when is it coming back? where is it now? what would happen if it hit us?" and other easy-to-answer questions at 4 a.m. It was a long Wednesday after that.

We had more storms over the weekend, which necessitated much fort building and even a little home improvement.


It made me a little crazy to be trapped inside because there was no organizing for me to do after my week of sickness cleaning extravaganza. But I did have a row of hooks for James to hang up for Cora's dresses and making him do that made me feel accomplished.


I had a mini happy hour yesterday after work with my best friend at the SEC. He started 3 weeks after me, so we both just had our 5-year anniversaries. As we clinked glasses (frozen margarita for me, obvs), he said- so did you think you'd still be here in 5 years?

No. Absolutely no. 3-4 years tops. Enough time to get me through the mid-level associate years and follow my mentor back to a partnership track senior associate or counsel position in BigLaw. Unlike nearly everyone else I work with now, I really liked my BigLaw job. I liked being a litigation associate. I thrived on running giant doc reviews and writing briefs under pressure until the wee hours of the morning. Being a law firm associate meant there was a clearly mapped out stair-step of tasks to achieve and gold stars to win and every year you moved up another step. Sure my life had no predictability and I worked and traveled way too much, but I was fucking good at it. Really good. And I liked doing something where I felt smart and competent and important most of the time. Sure, I realize now much of the importance came from a false feeling of constant urgency- like waking up to a blackberry full of emails and reading and responding to them before I even got out of bed, but it was a little addictive. And-- and this is still true-- I genuinely liked the legal work. It was a never-ending intellectual challenge to write some of the briefs I needed to write. To finesse facts and case law into a clear and convincing argument under the page limit. To make something deeply technical seem so clear and obvious the reader had no choice but to agree. I truly loved that. I still miss it. I miss a lot of it.

So, no, I never thought I'd still be here in 5 years. Even less, I never thought that at 5 years I'd have no plans of leaving at all.

Would I leave for the right opportunity? Sure. Am I looking for it? No. Do I think it will fall in my lap in charming little Fort Worth Texas? No. Would I consider commuting to Dallas? Absolutely not no never. So, here I am. A town I've fall in love with. A husband with a small business that is very local. A school and community we adore. A house I love that we could never afford anywhere else. A thriving, fun, cultural downtown and arts community (and zoo! #4 per USA Today) less than 5 miles away. A car that's 2 years old with less than 10,000 miles on it. My life is very local, very layered, and very happy.

I struggle sometimes with the fact that I feel I've allowed my career to stall. Or worse, not just allowed, but actively pushed my career to a side burner. I'm still at work 45 hours a week, but my job is very much cabined in those hours and I have no interest in extending them. I do enough but rarely look to do more. Far from gold-star searching and partner-pleasing, I'm efficient and competent and just... enough. I do enough. I don't do more. The me of 7 years ago would be disappointed. The me of 7 years ago is disappointed. I'm just no longer her.

On Monday I kissed the kids and headed out the door at 7:45 am. At 8 I was at my desk. I worked, went to lunch with my coworkers, and worked some more, drafting a document request to a foreign regulatory agency, taking a call with a partner at a top firm, and following up with another. I left at exactly 4:30 pm to get to my barre studio to teach my class at 5. At 4:50 I had my barre clothes on, my barre music blasting, and the big glass garage door in the studio open, soaking up the fresh air and even using a barbell and my phone's 10-second timer to get a few pictures to use to promote the class. I taught, loved it, and then drove my sweaty self home to greet Cora and our Monday nanny- who were both outside on our playset, playing pirates and princesses. I changed, cooked up one of our favorite dinners (southwestern bbq chicken quinoa salad) with Cora's help ("help"), and straightened up the house a bit. The big kids got home from the pool with James at 7, we ate, cleaned up, and got everyone in bed at 7:55. At exactly 8:00 my nominating committee for our PTA Board arrived at my house for wine, snacks, and the task of nominating all the positions of our Board (I'm Parliamentarian and this is one of my sacred duties). They left about 10:30. I went to join James on the couch, laying my head on his lap with my kindle while he worked with his laptop on his knees. We chatted, I read, he answered emails from prospective clients. We got in bed about 11:30.


That is a full, but fairly normal day and precisely sums up what the me of 7+ years ago couldn't understand. My life is so full. There are so many more dimensions to it. I have a second job that I love. I'm very involved in our school, a cause I believe in deeply. I can do all those things and still make a healthy dinner. I actually enjoy cooking that dinner because I have the time to do it. My kids are older and busier and so much more complicated than the babies and toddlers I had at the firm. I can support James in his busy and stressful life as an entrepreneur and swim coach. I read a LOT (in fact; at 11:30 when we got in bed that night my phone let me know it had downloaded the latest JR Ward novel and off I was, reading until 2:30 because I'm an idiot and paranormal romance novel addict). I work out 6 days a week. I want to get more into photography. I want to finish my kids' most recent photo books. I want to continue growing in my yoga practice. I cannot imagine taking these things away from this very rich life I now live.


And yet, when I see friends climbing up their prospective career ladders, when I see law school classmates making partner, when I read articles of women leaving law firms and the dearth of female partners I feel very much that I should be doing more. That I've let my own resume and past self down. Before I joined the SEC I think my job was about 80% of how I defined myself. And that worked well, because I was good at it. Now I'd say it's about 20. I'm okay with that for all the reasons I wrote above, but I'm maybe a little disappointed too. Or disappointed that I'm not disappointed. I don't know. I know that at the end of these tornadic thought cycles my 5-year-anniversary keeps putting me through I come out at the end with the same conclusion. This is a really good job. I get to do really high-level work that is interesting and challenging. If I stay, I will probably be in the exact same position I've been in for the last 5 years for the next 5 years too. I will not break any barriers or make any more money. But I will keep teaching barre. I will be involved in our school. I will spend hours and hours just hanging out on the couch with my husband, chatting about whatever pops in our minds. I will cook hundreds of new dinners and I will discover fascinating things about my children when they randomly pipe up to talk to me as I chop vegetables. I would like to volunteer more and am searching for my right place. I would like to sleep more, but as it's 11:56 p.m. while I type this, I suppose that one is unlikely no matter what job I have.


And yet. I thought I would be one of those amazing women who made partner in BigLaw. That I could prove it could be done when so many said it couldn't. And even if I'm the one who initiated the break-up with BigLaw, back then I really did think we'd get back together. And even though I'm also the one who's moved on- happily, fully, multi-dimensionally so, I have a little regret on an anniversary I didn't think I'd stay to see over the fact that I don't want it back. I think because I worry that at the core of it, I just didn't want to work that hard, and all the reasons I listed above are just excuses. And so the thought cyclone spins again.

But then, I decide yet again, even if that's true, maybe it doesn't matter. If I like where I am and what I'm doing, maybe it doesn't matter that I (maybe) could have achieved more on a different path entirely. Maybe it's okay that instead of constantly looking up in one narrow area of my life, I decided to pause and spread out instead. That seems so obviously true, it is surprising to me how often my brain has to go through this thought cycle just to settle back on the same thing again.

35 comments:

  1. Our lives, and our late night musings, have been on parallel tracks for years (absent the 6 day a week workouts, sadly ;) I too left private practice for our equivalent to the SEC several years ago. I often wonder if I am letting my ambitious self down, even though I am happier, less stressed, and my family sees and gets more of me than before. There is no right answer, I guess. Just paths taken, and not taken. Thank you for this...reading your thoughts both affirmed my own similarly conflicted emotions, and confirmed that I too probably took the "right" path for me...I think. Best wishes to you and your beautiful family.

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  2. Have you seen this series of articles? https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2016/12/ambition-interview/486479/
    It really resonated with me, as someone who only got married in her early 30s, and had kids shortly after, and moved to a new country for my husband's job. I really had to reassess what made me, well me. I had for so long defined myself and my success by my work. It was a big switch to suddenly not define my success by my career, and as much as I love the other things, I still struggle with feeling like I could be/should be on that fast path to career success that I left behind...

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  3. YES YES YES YES YES. I totally get all of this!

    I got my PhD at the top program in my field and then took a TEACHING JOB which is, like, NOT what R-1 grads want. When I was in DC over break, I thought about the other paths my life could have taken had I taken my career more seriously. But, I mean, I like the path I am on, the path I actively chose. IT'S SO HARD to balance all of the competing desires.

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  4. I love this post. Thank you for sharing it. I'm not in law but science. I work hard at a good job but a few years ago I was given an opportunity to move to a different state for a bigger job and I just didn't want it. I tried to explain that where I'm at in my career is ok for me, I don't have the mental energy to put 80% of my energy into my job right now. I want to be with my family and have flexibility. Maybe that will change but for right now I'm good. But yes, a classmate of mine just made VP and there was a little twinge of what if.

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    1. Oh and scary about the tornadoes!

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  5. I think sometimes women make different choices then men, and that is ok. I have a job I like but don't love, but it is 3 minutes from home, I'm good at it and it pays the bills and it allows me to be there for my family Is it my dream lawyer job, no, but for now, it is fine.

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  6. Thank you so much for writing this. You eloquently put into words what I feel and think a lot of the time. I was at a BigLaw firm in NYC for over 10 years. I was married the whole time I was there but no kids. I commuted 1.5 hours every day into work + exceeded my outrageous billables and traveled internationally every month. I had my daughter 3 years ago and stuck with it for 2 more years after she was born. I was up for equity partner and then I just decided I needed something more from life. Last year I made a big change that I still sometimes second guess. I moved to a much smaller firm, 15 minutes from home that allows me to work from home whenever I need to, no travel and no real pressure. While I am happy to work less, I sometimes worry that I'm no longer me, or rather the me that was then. I worry that my daughter will think that I settled for an easier life and that I'm not that impressive. Sigh.

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    1. I think your daughter will always be impressed with you because you are mommy. Plus, you are there to hug her and cuddle her.

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  7. I was just told at a big corporate job where I am trying to make partner that I am one of the brightest they have but they haven't seen me jump all in. I have two young kids. I already work over 60 hours a week. I set boundaries. I have had to accept that I can't pick my kids up from school every day and still make partner. I choose to pick my kids up. I have the same thoughts you do about what is enough while knowing I can be more and enjoying more.

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    1. OOOHHH I just got this too. Biglaw 6th year. EXACT SAME kind of feedback. Also 2 young kids. Also boundaries set and choices made. I did some major soul searching -- and I am moving to a boutique in 2 weeks.

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  8. I'm not a lawyer, but I have had this same mental thought lately about my career path. I was on one trajectory, had kids, and .... stopped. I still do some consulting and stay active, but I like the term "spread out." I'm involved in PTA. I've gotten very into working out. I run errands and plan play dates and work on my house and do endless projects and go have lunch with my kids and help at school and in church and.... I love it. Maybe I'll go back in a few years, and maybe I won't.

    Interestingly, my husband's career had taken off. Straight up. And I think we are both sometimes surprised by how different life has ended up. Happy! But, different.

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  9. I loved this post. Interestingly enough, I had quite the opposite experience. We moved from Philly to Fort Worth following my career path, looking for some "independence " and financial security after having trained at a top children's hospital and it just didn't work out for me. For us, as a family. I felt I was missing a lot of the academic world, I missed teaching and the challenges my job brought. I had a better salary, better schedule, more time at home with my daughter but I still wasn't happy. So we moved to Atlanta, and soon moving to NYC. I am now back on track in an academic setting and even though the hours are crazy and it's less money, this is what I want. This is my call in life. I don't think there is one way to do it, what works for your friend that made partner may not be what you want. I also think as we age and become older (and wiser, hopefully) we tend to be more aware and in touch with what we really want and what makes us happy. And that is all that matters. Your Yoga pose is amazing BTW!

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  10. Glad to hear your thoughts on this and how they have evolved over the last 5 years (how has it been 5 years?!?!)

    There are a lot of issues with getting more women to the top in big law (and banking and c-suite positions, etc), but I honestly think a large part of the issue is that many of the most talented women make the same decision you have. They were talented enough and had all the necessary skills (often times they would have actually been better candidates than the ones who did make it), but they decided to take an alternative path and then realized they never want to go back to the world of working 24-7, limited time with your kids and for hobbies, etc. I'm not saying there aren't things the firms can do better, but I think a lot of people make this same decision as you have because they realize it a truly better life for them and their families. No women's initiative or policy change can change that, particularly in professional services industries that are client driven. You are in an amazing sweet spot, where you have a great life with balance and you also get to have a job that is impressive. No one would ever look at you askance for staying in that situation. Instead, most of them envy you for having a balance that they wish they could have. You should be proud that your accomplishments have allowed you to be in that position. And who knows what the future will bring - we still have many years left in our careers!

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  11. I find this post really interesting because to me, your SEC job is totally kickass. I may be wrong but it sounds like you perceive it as stalling, not because it's less prestigious or intellectually challenging than Biglaw, but because it's not all-consuming and allows you to go home at night and have a life. I would submit that the Biglaw partners on the other end of the phone are looking at YOU and saying, "What am I doing with my life? Here's somebody who's doing important, challenging work with a great degree of independence, while I've slaved away all these years just to work my way up a meaningless hierarchy and be at the beck and call of corporate clients."

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    1. (But then, I have never looked at Biglaw partnership as the golden ring, and while I do feel a little twang of envy when another former classmate makes partner because it just sounds so cool, I don't entirely see the appeal.)

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    2. ^I agree with this. Your job is totally kickass!

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  12. Woah. Scary about the tornadoes. We are most likely moving to Dallas (after what looks like a brief move to St. George, Utah) this fall and I am freaked about tornadoes and tarantulas (maybe you can tell me if you've ever seen one?!). Glad all was well with you guys!

    I think we sometimes forget that our phase of life now will not always be the same. I am not a lawyer so maybe it's different, but I call what I'm in my "maintenance" phase of my career. Raising two small kids, doing what I can, but not aiming to move up or down right now. Maybe in the future it will be different. Maybe not. But right now, my family comes first. I think your life is SO full and happy and you are in exactly the place you need to be in right now.

    LOVE those workout leggings!!

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  13. Yes, and yes. I am a professional engineer - have been for more than 30 years now. Earlier in my career, I made this exact same choice. I chose my husband and my children over becoming a partner/associate/owner in a large national level firm. I chose life over career. Yes, I still have twinges of regret, and even outright envy when I see old friends who are now senior executives, but honestly? If I was offered a trip in a time machine and the same career path again, I would make the same choice. Life over career. Love over the corner office. Family over promotion.

    Those friends who broke through the glass ceilings? Most of them have broken marriages. Some are completely out of touch with their kids and grandbabies. Yes, they have peer recognition, accolades, awards and such, but the things they sacrificed to get there...it makes me sad to consider.

    I am still smart, talented and competent. I enjoy my work as an engineer. My career has been enough, because my husband and I have been able to feed, clothe and educate our four kids and set aside enough funds for a long and comfortable retirement. More importantly, my husband and I are a strong, happy foundation for our family because of the choice I made decades ago. We have raised four amazing young adults who are just now launching themselves into the world...four adults that grew up knowing they were loved and cherished, and who have deep family roots, amazing moral compasses, and sharp wits.

    You, My Dear, are wonderfully talented, beautiful and capable, and yes, you've made the right choice. Life over Career!!

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  14. I too have these worries... I am about to become a mom and after 6 years of working my ass off and climbing the corporate ladder I am taking maternity leave. Though I work for an amazing group of talented women who are encouraging me to take the time, it is downright terrifying that in the 5 months I am gone, I will become irrelevant or miss opportunities that would have grown my career. That said, I am excited to be a parent, and like you live a full life in and out of the office.

    I have to say, while I understand the feeling of "let down" because you're not pushing as hard as you were at work, it seems like you have it all... a job you like, fulfilled happy kids, a good marriage and the ability to actively participate in your own "self care" by nourishing the things you think are important. I truly admire women like you sometimes more than the "corporettes" out there because it takes a lot of introspection and hard work to live a balanced and rich life in the way you do. Kudos to you! (Also- I love your blog- it's my absolute favorite! And I'm sorry to hear about the tornado... sounds so scary!)

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  15. I often have similar thoughts, though not about Biglaw. I am a public defender and have been my entire legal career (almost 10 years now.) People are always asking me when am I going to leave the PD and go to a firm, that I have marketable skills now and the PD is a training ground for bigger and better things. But I love my job, I love the work I do, it feels important and worthwhile to me, and the hours in my practice area (appellate) are somewhat flexible which is important to me in raising three kids. I don't have any desire to leave, though I would like to make more money. But I think about not doing this kind of work, and I can't imagine it.

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  16. Awesome blog! No particular reason other than true and honest thoughts, it’s not that often we get to see the vulnerable LL.

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  17. Wow! Thank you for sharing! It seems that it is really easy to look across the fence and see what might have been or where you might be if you haven't left big law. From the outside looking in I'd say you have an amazing gig, or gigs. All of the wonderful things in your life that are outside work might not be possible if you were still in big law.

    I wonder myself sometimes if I don't care enough about work (I enjoy it, but I really enjoy going home every day, too) or if I just haven't found the right work.

    Congrats on your 5 years! It's a great accomplishment. :-)

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  18. That is some serious upper body strength, very impressive pose!!

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  19. Thank you for sharing! I have been having an internal struggle of should I ramp up at work to try and advance like I have done in the past (and expected to always do) or should I embrace my current role and how much freedom it allows for me to live my life and enjoy my children. You validated those feelings for me and I really appreciate it!

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  20. I'm a first year associate in big law in DC and ohmygod I've never felt so connected to someone else's words! You really articulated your feelings so well that I can almost feel them too. I have the same thoughts already - I love this job (so far..) despite its many shortcomings and I already feel guilty if I ever leave because I sit here complaining about lack of female partners and in the same breath, I'm not sure that lifestyle is what I want for the entirety of this one life I get to live. You have clearly made the right decision for yourself (and your family) and I really admire that! I do often wonder what we can do to solve the partnership gender disparity and I'm just not sure..

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  21. The problem, I think, is American professional work culture. We all--men and women, in pretty much all white-collar fields--work too much, and the expectation that the smartest and most successful people will be always on, always available, always striving, harms everyone, but disproportionately harms women vis-a-vis advancement and promotions. Because of caregiving responsibilities and expectations, women are disproportionately likely to say "screw it" and choose something more workable for family life, though obviously many/most of the men who stay in BigLaw and its equivalents are not well-served by the status quo. (And it's not just professional work culture that sucks; blue-collar and service workers often end up with too few hours, or totally unpredictable hours, with predictably bad effects on parenting and family life.)

    That's not to say that it's impossible to have a great career and a rich and fulfilling life; you seem to have found that sweet spot. "Great career" just can't mean "all-consuming career." And in the US, that means that some jobs are just always going to be no-gos.
    https://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/11/jobs/an-alpine-antidote-to-working-weekends.html?_r=0

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  22. Your life sounds amazing. Everything you expected of yourself as younger Lag Liv now plays out across a much broader spectrum. You are still clever, hard working and resourceful - all that has changed is where you have directed your energy and focus. Good on you. Working full time with a second job on the side and all your other interests already place you in the exceptional working mother category. I have a toddler and work at a big firm, I am in my fifth year now. Unlike you, I don't love the work, but I'm here to build experience and my resume so I have more interesting options when my kid (kids, hopefully) are older and need me around a bit more. Your situation sounds ideal to me.

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  23. Thank you for this!! I often have the same thoughts, but looking back at my 1L, or even 3L EIC/get-published/do-all-the-things/graduate top(ish)-of-the-class, self, because I went to law school later in life and went straight in-house and had a baby. I feel like I let my gunner self down by never trying Big Law (not that they were exactly banging my door down in the magical post-recession years), but I keep coming back to "If I like where I am and what I'm doing, maybe it doesn't matter that I (maybe) could have achieved more on a different path entirely." I really LIKE being able to see my toddler for multiple hours a day, AND stay in shape/eat relatively healthily, AND occasionally read for fun. Maybe that's all that matters. But, like you, I always have to return and think it through now and then to remind myself of that.

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  24. I am just catching up on this post but I have been thinking about this a lot lately also. My life DEFINITELY has not turned out the way I thought it would when I started law school back in 2007. I had to take a break from school when I got divorced and then re-entered school in kind of a non-traditional way and then my career soared to Biglaw salary level without even sitting for the bar. Not expected. But now I have three kids and I've been through a layoff and I've found a job only a half-hour from my house which I love. I never could understand why my female attorney mentor was so busy outside of working hours or why she was not working 24/7. Now that my oldest is almost 14, I see how crazy life is with three kids and how rich it can be. More importantly, I realize I don't want the unbalanced life that I had previously. I love spending time with my family and my friends and I don't want to get to the end of my life and realize I didn't do those things. Will I still be a workaholic at times, probably yes. Will it get back to the levels it was at when I was working full-time, going to law school at night and trying to be everything to everyone? Doubtful. And I need to remember that this new reality is not only okay but actually pretty damn good.

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  25. (Belatedly) thanks for this - I appreciate your honesty. Do you think that you might have come to this conclusion while staying at the firm, or would you never have had the time/chance to do the other things that led you to this point? I ask because I've gone through a sort of similar thing - very different in that I never was a firm and I don't have kids, but my priorities have shifted nonetheless. Not sure if it's simply age, or that I had some breathing space (in a very humane clerkship) to develop hobbies and outside interests of my own. But somewhere along the line I realized work wasn't and couldn't be my everything the way I had assumed for a long time. (I was never on track for a biglaw partnership so I can't say I worry about not reaching the pinnacle of success - I changed careers and came to this one too late to envision getting into a truly influential position; now I just hope to do the job I do have as well as I can!)

    Also I think it's totally fine if you just didn't want to work that hard. Americans valorize work too much. :)

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    1. I agree with that last point - it is fine. I don't like working hard. I think I would love big law if it was confined to 9-5 hours. But it's not, so I don't. My dream is to get paid a lot to do interesting work for eight hours a day. That's all I ask! I'm in Australia though and I get paid about the same as my friends who are school teachers with the same experience (five years at a firm, on less than $95k per year), so there's not really much pay off for all the extra hours involved. Sounds like lawyers get paid more in the USA.

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  26. Two comments:

    1. Do you wonder whether these thought cycles that you (and almost every one of your commentators) wrote about are thought cycles that men also have? Do men ask themselves if they should choose "life" over "career"? Do they see it as such-- i.e. binary? Does it have to be? Are women in mid- or upper-level career positions more prone this kind of reflection?

    2. Sometimes it is not the pressure of the job that is attractive, but rather the content of it and it can be hard for driven ambitious people to parse the difference. You say you liked the intellectual challenge of your previous job. Do you like it better than the intellectual challenge of your current job? If you could do your previous job, without the late nights, unpredictability and urgency, entirely within a normal 8-10 hour workday, would you do it? If yes, are there ways (other types of jobs in law) where you can be intellectually challenged and not work like a slave at the expense of your many other dimensions? For example, could you be a law professor? Or work at a boutique firm? Or... I don't know because it's not my field. (I am a tenured engineering professor and I can attest to the intellectual challenge of teaching, research, and sometimes consulting to keep my head in the profession. My job fulfills me completely and I almost always make time to be home with my kids and partner, and to make dinners every night and work out five days a week.)

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  27. I'm always so fascinated when you write that you want to go back to big law at some point. Having been at two difference firms in big law and now having landed at the same agency as you, I cannot imagine going back. I think it's safe to say that I'm a lifer (if they'll keep me). I suppose the difference is that I feel like I have landed my dream job, one that allows me to focus on an area of the law that I love, with a lot more power (I get to tell law firm partners what they can and cannot do and they are oh so respectful!) and within the confines of a normal work day! I have to say though that I'm also amazed at your ability to squeeze in so much in a day. I barely have it in me to cook dinner at the end of a work day, and I only have two. I would so love to have the energy to read and work out regularly after work! Thank you for always being an inspiration!

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  28. Have you ever thought about running for political office? I'm a long-time blog reader of yours and whenever I hear about how we need more women in government, I always think that you would be the perfect candidate....

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